Course Summary of TrainSignal’s Course “SharePoint Server 2013 Administration” - Part 4

 

Editor’s note: Contributor Stephan Onisick is a Senior Software Developer for HP specializing in SharePoint Portal Applications. Follow him @StephanOnisick

Lesson 11: Configuring Email for SharePoint

This lesson goes much deeper than this author wishes to pursue and probably deeper than most “Newbies” will wade into. This section is more suited for the “Super” or Advanced Admin Types.

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Looks Innocent Enough?

Bill configures Incoming and Outgoing Email for the Servers. Also he sets up an SMTP Server as well as configuring the Exchange Settings in Exchange.

He starts the lesson by Adding the SPContacts Organizational Unit in Active Directory and goes through the Delegation Control Wizard to add the Central Administration App Pool account. His objective is to be able to create and delete child objects. This gives the Administrator delete subtree permissions for the account.

Next, Bill goes into Active Directory “Advanced Features” to for SPContacts. His purpose is to give the SPFarm account permission to delete subtrees.

He then goes back to the Domain Controller and configures the SMTP App:

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Adding the SMTP Server Role

After Installing Bill restarts IIS and begins to configure the various properties:

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Setting Properties on SMTP Server

The rest of the lesson gets blurry for an Exchange-Challenged Author. Bill Opens the Exchange Management Shell to run a PowerShell Script to get the Exchange Virtual Directory Path: http://gmexc-13.globomantics.com/ecp.

Next he uses the URL to access the Outlook Web App (Exchange 2013 Admin Center). After signing in, in Exchange he configures Send Connectors for Incoming Email and Receive Connectors for Outgoing Emails.

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Mail Flow Receiver

After this Exchange Excursion, configuring the Input and Output and attaching it to Lists is a piece of cake.

(This is Lesson not for the faint of heart!)

Lesson 12: Working With Sites

Much of this and the next lesson are user interface. It’s good knowledge to have and the review doesn’t hurt—but I won’t classify it as strictly “Administrator”.

Here’s an example of “Adding an App”:


Adding An App

(Hopefully, by now you’ve drunk the SharePoint 2013 Kool-Aid and realize everything’s an App. It’s what God created on the eighth day!)

Lesson 13: Create Libraries, Lists, and Tasks

Much of this lesson is also User Interface Stuff: a good review but not necessarily Admin Stuff.

That being said I really learned some stuff about the relationship of Task Lists to Time Lines, Predecessor Tasks, Pert Charts and Calendars:

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Task Lists and Timelines

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Tasks on Calendar

(I was obviously surprised and delighted about the strong Microsoft Project-like analysis that can be performed in Out-of-the-Box SharePoint. My advice—if you’ve been around SharePoint 2013 somewhat, just to skip to the “Create Tasks” segment of this lesson. )

Lesson 14: Working with My Sites

This lesson has more relevancy to me for administration. My Sites has complex ties to the User Profile Services, Active Directory and can be connected to the user’s tasks on any site collection.

Bill graciously creates most of his user’s My Sites webs. Then he walks us through the creation of Heather Ackerman’s My Sites web. Bills show the Active Directory connections in data that gets populated:

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Heather’s My Sites with Active Directory Data for People followed

Next, Bill signs in as himself and goes to his My Sites. He shows how to follow other people through the interface. He shows how to add a blog and other Apps to his My Sites. He, then, elaborates on the ability to see your tasks from the My Sites:

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Bill assigned Tasks as seen on his My Sites

Bill further demonstrates the capability of SharePoint 2013 My Sites to follow other sites. He does this by going to a site and commenting on a newsfeed. Then, he selects to follow that site. This means he will now receive information from the newsfeed on his My Sites.

Then, Bill proceeds to follow a document on SharePoint site. Next he shows the list that he is following and shows how the My Sites software picked-up all his activities and listed them on his activities page:

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Notorious Bill’s Activities

He also shows the documents that he is following. Next he notes that if someone changes one of the documents he is following, his newsfeed will be updated with that activity.

(I don’t know about you but I’m sold –Sign me Up for My Sites!)

Lesson 15: Configure the Office Web Apps Server

Bill first explains that the Office Web App Server allows for the viewing of Word, PowerPoint, One-Note and Excel in a Browser. Also this is a server product that runs on its own server. This can be installed on one or many servers on your farm—but your farm must use Claims Authentication. Office Web Apps supports viewing on multiple platforms such as Macs, Tablets, Slates, Smart Phone and other browser-enabled phones.

He further notes the Office Web App Server is very limited as to what other software can be installed such as SQL, LINQ or Microsoft Office Desktop Applications or Web Services using ports 80 or 443.

First he downloads the app from http://ITtra.in/downloadWepApp. He next configures the Server with specific roles. He points out additional downloads for Server 2008 as opposed to Server 2012: http://ITtra.in/ServerRoles

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Server Roles and Features

After configuring the Server, Bill installs the downloaded Application. Next he creates the Office Web App through PowerShell Command:

New-OfficeWebAppsFarm –InternalURL http://gmowa.globomantics.com –AllowHttp
-EditEnabled

(All one line—for Bill’s Server)

Next he checks if the Office Web App Server has been created by typing the URL into a browser to check the discovery: http://gmowa.globomantics.com/hosting/discovery

As luck would have it, we have a Web App Server.

At this point, Bill switches to the SharePoint Server and proceeds to use the SharePoint Management Shell (PowerShell). Next he creates the binding from SharePoint to the Office Web App Server. After a series of PowerShell commands it’s soup. He creates the bindings and switches the service from https to http. Finally he has to change the Oath to check over http as well.

Now all is well in Bill Land:

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Note the Option to Edit in Excel Web App

(Note the user no longer has to have Excel on his desktop to edit the App. Not all features are—but most are available.)

What Could be Enhanced for the Future

This course is stellar and really pushes the envelope for SharePoint 2013. Seriously, if you skip any one section of this article, you can safely miss this section without loss—I love this course.

But being a critic and writer, I’m listing a few things for TrainSignal to consider as they spiral upward under the PluralSight banner:

  • A Pre-Test and Post-Test Assessment would be welcome.
  • Downloads were by lesson and include a voice recording as well as a PDF.
    • A single download would be preferable.
    • It would be nice if the voice downloads were optional. They are really time-consuming and not everyone will use them.
    • The PDFs were not labeled and did not contain all the screens.
      (Hint: Hire someone who can document courses better—gee I think I know someone! :-) )
    • The Progress on the Overall Course is visible but a way to see the uncompleted sections would be of added value to user.

Conclusion: Summary and Forward SharePointing Direction

Great Course! How can you help but learn. Real Practical Applications with real problems that are encountered. Kudos to Bill Kulterman. 5 Star!

Also remember when this course came out, there weren’t many SharePoint 2013 Administration courses on the Net.

My aim was to provide a thorough feel for the content Bill taught. Also having taught college for four years, I try to add to the pool of knowledge. I would hope that this could also add to your TrainSignal Course Experience.

(So Many Screens to Document-So Little Time!)

Happy SharePoint 2013ing
Stephan

For everything SharePoint and Office 365 from the community for the community!